Articles related to Recession
 
Mike Hewitt - Dollar Daze
America's Forgotten War Against the Central Banks
"Let me issue and control a nation's money supply, and I care not who makes its laws." (Mayer Amschel Rothschild, Founder of Rothschild Banking Dynasty) Many prominent Americans such as Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and Andrew Jackson have argued and fought against the central banking polices used throughout Europe. A note issued by a central bank, such as the Federal Reserve Note, is bank currency. These notes are given to the government in exchange for an interest-bearing g
Sunday, December 30, 2018
Alasdair Macleod - FinanceandEconomics
  Why gold is better than cash 
The question most often asked of gold bulls is, “At what price will you take your profits?” It is a question that betrays a lack of understanding about why anyone should own gold. Nevertheless, the simple answer must be, “When paper money stops losing its value”. This response should alert anyone who asks this question to the idea that owning fiat cash is the speculative position, not ownership of precious metals.
Friday, November 30, 2018
Mickey Fulp - Mercenary Geologist
The Never-Ending Wars of the United States of America
A Monday Morning Musing from Mickey the Mercenary Geologist"War is a racket. It always has been. It is possibly the oldest, easily the most profitable, surely the most vicious. It is the only one international in scope. It is the only one in which the profits are reckoned in dollars and the losses in lives. A racket is best described, I believe, as something that is not what it seems to the majority of the people. Only a small 'inside' group knows what it is about. It is conducted for the benefi
Wednesday, November 21, 2018
Frank Shostak
There Are Two Types of Credit — One of Them Leads to Booms and Busts
In the slump of a cycle, businesses that were thriving begin to experience difficulties or go under. They do so not because of firm-specific entrepreneurial errors but rather in tandem with whole sectors of the economy. People who were wealthy yesterday have become poor today. Factories that were busy yesterday are shut down today, and workers are out of jobs.Businessmen themselves are confused as to why. They cannot make sense of why certain business practices that were profitable yesterday are
Thursday, November 15, 2018
Gerard Jackson - Brookes News
How the Laffer curve really works 
Kennedy declared that “it is a paradoxical that tax rates are too high and tax revenues too low”. In other words, high taxes were depressing output. Acting on this belief — what so many today sneeringly call supply-side economics — he cut taxes in 1963 and investment surged ahead. In the four years preceding the Kennedy cuts only 27.8 per cent of what is termed investment went to business and 38.5 per cent to real estate.
Wednesday, September 26, 2018
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
The Bank of England, 1720-1913
In 1844, there was a new regulation of the Bank of England, which separated the Bank into an Issue Department and a Banking Department. The Issue Department was solely responsible for issuing and managing banknotes, or "currency in circulation." The Banking Department was responsible for lending, including deposits. We recognize today that deposits at the currency issuer (central bank) are a form of base money, much like banknotes, because they are accepted as an ultimate form of payment. Thus, what we now recognize as "base money" was split between the two Departments. This introduced some funny issues, which we may talk about in much more detail later.
Monday, September 17, 2018
Lew Rockwell
  What's Killing the Jobs Market 
The terrible job market has vexed an entire generation. It shows no hope of improving anytime soon. Young people are shut out. College students are taking refuge in matriculation without end. Thirty-somethings are zoning out in their parents' basements and attics. Despair for the future has become a theme of American public life. The question we must ask is: why is unemployment stuck at 10% in the narrowest measure and as high as 30% for some demographics?
Saturday, September 8, 2018
John Butler - Goldmoney
A banker for all seasons: the life and times of John Exter – champion of sound money 
The following is an introduction to a series of essays GoldMoney will be publishing, written by John Butler and Barry Downs, looking at the life and times of John Exter – leader in the fight against Richard Nixon, Alan Greenspan and the debasement of the US dollar. The source material for these essays includes John Exter's collected papers and works; the personal experiences, diary entries and recollections of the author; and interviews with former colleagues, friends and family of John Exter's.
Thursday, July 12, 2018
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
The View From 2011
Today, we will continue our discussion of the “gold sterilization” of 1937. June 18, 2017: The “Gold Sterilization” of 1937 June 25, 2017: The “Gold Sterilization” of 1937 #2: Fumbling and Bumbling We will look at an influential 2011 paper by Douglas Irwin, available here: http://www.nber.org/papers/w17595.pdf All in all, I think the paper is pretty good, at least in its basic descriptions. It meanders into the usual channels of pointless Monetarism, with some equally pointless math, but it does
Monday, June 25, 2018
Mike Maloney - Goldsilver
  Gold Silver Confiscation: Can the Government Seize Assets
One concern of retail precious metals investors is the possibility of a gold confiscation.Imagine having the forethought to buy gold to shield your finances from an economic or monetary crisis—only to have it taken away from you by your government. You’d lose not just the protective buffer you put in place but potentially a chunk of your net worth.Gold confiscation may sound preposterous to investors used to securities or real estate. But it’s happened in the past enough times to make it a reaso
Friday, June 15, 2018
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
The “Gold Sterilization” of 1937
Today, we will start investigating the U.S. recession of 1937, and along with that, claims that the Federal Reserve caused it by some sort of misbehavior. As is our usual practice, we will begin with just looking at some general information about that time. Industrial production had a short, sharp shock in 1937. Here’s what it looked like in terms of nominal GDP: I am not going to try to disentangle what was going on at that time. There were a lot of things, from the introduction of Social Sec
Monday, June 4, 2018
Chris Ciovacco - Ciovacco Capital Management
Want To Reduce Missteps Become A Two-Faced Investor
Improving Your Perspective On Markets. We all want: To become better investors. To improve our ability to probabilistically forecast future market outcomes. To reduce daily investment stress. To sleep better at night. If any of the points above apply to our current investment circumstances, it is highly unlikely these issues will be addressed unless we are willing to take an honest inventory of our current approach to the financial markets. Topic Is Timely Stocks have been holdi
Wednesday, May 16, 2018
Ronan Manly - Bullion Star
New Gold Pool at the BIS Basle, Switzerland: Part 1
“In the Governor’s absence I attended the meeting in Zijlstra’s room in the BIS on the afternoon of Monday, 10th December to continue discussions about a possible gold pool. Emminger, de la Geniere, de Strycker, Leutwiler, Larre and Pohl were present.”      13 December 1979 – Kit McMahon to Gordon Richardson, Bank of England Introduction A central bank Gold Pool which many people will be familiar with operated in the gold market between November 1961 and March 1968. That Gold Pool was known as t
Wednesday, May 2, 2018
Mike Hewitt - Dollar Daze
  Hyperinflation around the Globe 
Angola (1991-1999) Angola went through the worst inflation from 1991 to 1995. In early 1991, the highest denomination was 50,000 kwanzas. By 1994, it was 500,000 kwanzas. In the 1995 currency reform, 1 kwanza reajustado was exchanged for 1,000 kwanzas. The highest denomination in 1995 was 5,000,000 kwanzas reajustados. In the 1999 currency reform, 1 new kwanza was exchanged for 1,000,000 kwanzas reajustados. The overall impact of hyperinflation: 1 new kwanza = 1,000,000,000 pre-1991 kwanzas.
Monday, April 23, 2018
Mickey Fulp - Mercenary Geologist
Gold, Silver, and the US Dollar: 1792-1971
In today's musing, I review the history of gold, silver, and fiat currency as money in the United States of America. I document how various wars, panics and depressions, Congressional acts, and executive orders have affected the US dollar prices of precious metals and resulting gold-silver ratios.This musing covers the period from 1792 when the United States government first established a national currency backed by gold and silver until
Thursday, April 19, 2018
Antal E. Fekete - Gold University
Is Aggregate Debt Excessive
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Sunday, March 18, 2018
Przemyslaw Radomski CFA - SunshineProfits
Is the Economic Summer Coming
Cycles, cycles everywhere. We’ve already discussed the current state of the U.S. business cycle, arguing that the expansion should last for a while, although it is more advanced than in Europe. However, business cycles aren’t the only creatures living in an economic zoo. They are simply the most popular within the modern macroeconomics. The post-war business cycles lasted, on average, almost 6 years. But economists distinguished also shorter cycles, called Kitchin inventory cycles, which are bel
Saturday, March 17, 2018
Przemyslaw Radomski CFA - SunshineProfits
Are We Going to $1,120 or $1,510 No Matter What, Own Some Gold!
Who will win: bulls or bears? The LBMA published its annual forecast survey for precious metals prices in 2018. Gold prices range from $1,120 to $1,510. Where is the price of the yellow metal headed? Summary of the Survey The views of about 30 analysts in the 2018 forecasts are strongly divergent. The average price of gold is projected to be $1,318, so it is expected to be around the current level, but almost 5 percent higher than the last year’s average of $1,257.12. However, the average gold p
Friday, March 16, 2018
Gerard Jackson
The "wealth effect" an Austrian view
It is being said that if the fed could just get the ‘wealth effect’ into motion the US economy would fully recover from the recession. But the ‘wealth effect’ is a phantom, the sort of economic fallacy that only a Keynesian could conjure up.  Those who support this fiction argue that a stock market’s performance is driven by a net inflow of funds which in turn is driven by economic growth. They go further by saying that growth in turn is driven by investment, innovation and productivity, all of
Tuesday, March 13, 2018
George F. Smith - Barbarous Relic
Gary North on central banking, gold, federal debt, and Keynesianism
I have never met Gary North and probably never will.Yet, through his writings he has had a far-reaching influence on my thinking, especially with regard to government and economics.He runs a membership website, GaryNorth.com.For $14.95 a month you get access to everything on the site, including four daily articles that he writes six days a week and posts while most people are still asleep.Members can ask questions in the forums to which he and other members will post replies. North wrote what
Tuesday, March 13, 2018
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