Articles related to economists
 
George F. Smith - Barbarous Relic
Gary North on central banking, gold, federal debt, and Keynesianism
I have never met Gary North and probably never will.Yet, through his writings he has had a far-reaching influence on my thinking, especially with regard to government and economics.He runs a membership website, GaryNorth.com.For $14.95 a month you get access to everything on the site, including four daily articles that he writes six days a week and posts while most people are still asleep.Members can ask questions in the forums to which he and other members will post replies. North wrote what
Friday, March 1, 2019
Alasdair Macleod - Finance and Eco.
The origin of cycles
It was Karl Marx who was among the first believers that cyclical behaviour was endemic to free markets.He lived through a time when there was a regular cycle of boom and bust, with phases of economic expansion followed by contraction. Workers were employed and then unemployed, and the only way this could be stopped, in Marxian economics, was for the workers to acquire the means of production, or more correctly, the state to do so on their behalf.Other economists, such as Jevons and Wicksell, rec
Thursday, February 7, 2019
Graham Summer - Gains Pains & Capital
The West Will Become The New ‘Third World’: PricewaterhouseCoopers 
Hold your real assets outside of the banking system in one of many private international facilities  -->    https://www.sprottmoney.com/intlstorage  The West Will Become The New ‘Third World’: PricewaterhouseCoopers Written by Jeff Nielson (CLICK HERE FOR ORIGINAL) First World The term “First World” refers to so called developed, capitalist, industrial countries, roughly, a bloc of countries aligned with the United States after word war II, with more or less common political and economi
Wednesday, January 30, 2019
Keith Weiner - Monetary Metals
What makes gold good money
People say that gold is rare this is why it makes good money. To make an analogy to the porridge in Goldilocks, the temperature could not be too cold or too hot. If gold were too common, or too rare, it would not work as money. Think of sand, which is too common, or blue diamonds which are too rare (and diamonds would not work as money anyway. Rather than focusing on its rarity, let’s look at extracting it. It has generally held true that the cost to mine an ounce of gold was around one ounce of
Tuesday, January 22, 2019
John Paul Koning - Bullion Star
How California stayed with gold when the rest of the U.S. adopted fiat money
We are ten years into the age of bitcoin. But people are still using national currencies like yen, dollars, and pounds to buy things. What does history have to say about switches from one type of monetary system to another? In this post I’ll dig for lessons from California’s successful resistance to a fiat standard that was imposed on it in the 1860s by the rest of the U.
Saturday, January 19, 2019
George F. Smith - Barbarous Relic
  Fielding my grandson’s questions about gold and banking
My grandson had quite a day at school.He had learned that the economy had been suffering from things called Panics, capital P, during the 19th century and had another big one in the early 20th century.He had been told that responsible, public-spirited men like J. P. Morgan had organized a central bank to prevent those Panics.He and other bankers finally got the government to go along with their idea and pass it into law in late 1913.And wouldn’t you know it — we’ve had no more Panics since then.
Saturday, January 5, 2019
Frank Shostak
Inflation Is Not About Price Increases
There is almost complete unanimity among economists and various commentators that inflation is about general increases in the prices of goods and services. From this it is established that anything that contributes to price increases sets in motion inflation.A fall in unemployment or a rise in economic activity is seen as a potential inflationary trigger. Some other triggers, such as rises in commodity prices or workers’ wages, are also regarded as potential threats.If inflation is just a genera
Friday, November 30, 2018
Frank Shostak
  Why It's Important to Define Money Correctly
Most economists hold that, since the early 1980s, correlations between various definitions of money and national income have broken down. The reason for this breakdown, it is held, is that financial deregulation has made the demand for money unstable. As a result it is held the usefulness of money as a predictor of economic events has significantly diminished.To fix the instability of the demand for money, economists have introduced a gauge of the money supply known as the Divisia monetary indic
Thursday, November 29, 2018
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
Why Base Your Money On Gold A Simple Answer For First-Timers
The United States embraced the principle of a gold standard – a dollar whose value was linked to a defined quantity of gold – from 1789 to 1971, a stretch of 182 years. During this time, the U.S. was the most successful of any major country, expanding from thirteen war-ravaged states along the Atlantic
Sunday, November 18, 2018
Robert P. Murphy
The Gold Standard Did not Cause the Great Depression
Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics 19, no. 1 (Spring 2016): 101–111[The Midas Paradox: Financial Markets, Government Policy Shocks, and the Great Depression by Scott Sumner]The Midas Paradox is an impressive piece of scholarship, representing the magnum opus of economist Scott Sumner. What makes the book so unique is Sumner’s use of real-time financial data and press accounts in order to explain not just broad issues—such as, “What caused the Great Depression?”—but to offer commentary on th
Wednesday, November 14, 2018
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
God, Gold and Guns
We’ve been looking into One Nation Under Gold (2017), by James Ledbetter. October 2, 2017: One Nation Under Gold (2017), by James Ledbetter October 14, 2017: One Nation Under Gold #2: The Silliness of the Bretton Woods Years Now, we will follow Ledbetter’s account of the end of Bretton Woods in 1971, up to the present. The account of the 1971 devaluation was, following the pattern of this book, long on details but short on insight. It seemed to people at the time that they “had no choice,” that
Tuesday, October 23, 2018
Jesse - Le Cafe Américain
Most Economists and Market Pundits In De-nile - Walk Like an Egyptian
"No regulatory penalties, no criminal indictments for fraud, no clawbacks, no prohibitions of bonuses at least during early phase of financial market recovery, all of this sticks in my mind as unjustifiable— and imprudent, as it taught a lasting lesson that bankers had immunity." Dr. Harald Malmgren "At the recent market peak, the most reliable measures of U.S. equity market valuation (those best correlated w/actual subsequent long-term returns) were about 200% above (3 times) historical no
Friday, October 12, 2018
Jeff Clark - Goldsilver
What the Upcoming Wealth Transfer Will Look Like
With gold up 26% year-to-date and silver up 41%, and stock and bond markets looking increasingly precarious, it’s time to start thinking about the upcoming wealth transfer. If Mike is right about what’s ahead for gold and silver, we’ll soon be part of a life-changing shift. Have you thought about how the wealth transfer might affect you? Not like this you haven’t…You grab a calculator for the third time that day, multiplying your gold and silver ounces by the price of each… the total staggers yo
Sunday, September 9, 2018
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
Blame Gold
We have been talking about The Midas Paradox (2015), by Scott Sumner. July 23, 2017: The Midas Paradox (2015), by Scott Sumner. As you probably guessed from the three-word title, the book can be summarized in two words, which are: “blame gold.” This, as we have seen, is actually a relatively new notion, even if it enjoys some popularity today. The general consensus, which later (after 1950) became the Keynesian consensus, did not blame gold, or indeed, monetary policy in general, for the Great D
Tuesday, July 17, 2018
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
The View From 2011
Today, we will continue our discussion of the “gold sterilization” of 1937. June 18, 2017: The “Gold Sterilization” of 1937 June 25, 2017: The “Gold Sterilization” of 1937 #2: Fumbling and Bumbling We will look at an influential 2011 paper by Douglas Irwin, available here: http://www.nber.org/papers/w17595.pdf All in all, I think the paper is pretty good, at least in its basic descriptions. It meanders into the usual channels of pointless Monetarism, with some equally pointless math, but it does
Monday, June 25, 2018
Alasdair Macleod - Finance and Eco.
  Understanding money and prices
This article explains the money side of prices, and why government currencies, unbacked by gold, are doomed to collapse. And why gold, which is the sound money chosen by markets throughout history, will retain or increase its purchasing power measured in the goods it buys over the coming years.Very few people have a full understanding of the relationship between money and goods. This is the relationship that sets prices. Yet, without that understanding, central banks will almost certainly fail i
Sunday, June 17, 2018
Steve Saville - Speculative Investor
Why bad economic theories remain popular
Ludwig von Mises and Friedrich Hayek, the most prominent “Austrian” economists of the time, anticipated the 1929 stock market crash and correctly predicted the dire consequences of government attempts to artificially stimulate economic growth in the aftermath of the crash. John Maynard Keynes, on the other hand, was totally blindsided by the stock market crash and the economic disaster of the early 1930s. And yet, Keynes’s theories gained enormous popularity during the 1930s whereas the work of
Saturday, May 12, 2018
Chris Powell - GATA
Pro-govt. Turkish paper reprints Manly's RT exposure of gold price suppression
Gold researcher Ronan Manly's detailed report for Russia Today on the history and mechanisms of gold price suppression by central banks, called to your attention by GATA a few hours ago -- http://gata.org/node/18112 -- has been quickly reprinted by the Daily Sabah, a major newspaper in Istanbul, Turkey, that is published in English, German, Arabic, and Russian: https://www.dailysabah.com/finance/2018/03/18/central-banks-have-long-hi... While it's good that word of the gold price suppression sche
Monday, March 19, 2018
Przemyslaw Radomski CFA - SunshineProfits
Is the Economic Summer Coming
Cycles, cycles everywhere. We’ve already discussed the current state of the U.S. business cycle, arguing that the expansion should last for a while, although it is more advanced than in Europe. However, business cycles aren’t the only creatures living in an economic zoo. They are simply the most popular within the modern macroeconomics. The post-war business cycles lasted, on average, almost 6 years. But economists distinguished also shorter cycles, called Kitchin inventory cycles, which are bel
Saturday, March 17, 2018
Alasdair Macleod - Finance and Eco.
The egregious errors of static statistics
The measure of a man's real character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out. Lord Macaulay wrote this nearly two hundred years ago. His aphorism is particularly apposite of modern politicians, and also of the modern state itself, which is meant to be selfless in the interest of the common good. We can be certain that when a person moves from outside to inside the machinery of the state, he or she changes from representing the people to representing the state. Presumably ther
Friday, March 16, 2018
12345678910...