Articles related to monetary
 
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
Blame Gold
We have been talking about The Midas Paradox (2015), by Scott Sumner. July 23, 2017: The Midas Paradox (2015), by Scott Sumner. As you probably guessed from the three-word title, the book can be summarized in two words, which are: “blame gold.” This, as we have seen, is actually a relatively new notion, even if it enjoys some popularity today. The general consensus, which later (after 1950) became the Keynesian consensus, did not blame gold, or indeed, monetary policy in general, for the Great D
Wednesday, July 3, 2019
Frank Shostak
  Why Wage Growth Is So Weak
The yearly growth rate of average hourly earnings in production and non-supervisory employment in the private sector eased to 2.3% in June from 2.4% in May.Many experts are puzzled by the subdued increase in workers earnings. After all, it is held the US economy has been in an expansionary phase for quite some time now. Softer real output growth important reason why hourly earnings remain under pressureAccording to the US Government’s own data, since 2000, in terms of industrial producti
Wednesday, June 19, 2019
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
The View From 2011
Today, we will continue our discussion of the “gold sterilization” of 1937. June 18, 2017: The “Gold Sterilization” of 1937 June 25, 2017: The “Gold Sterilization” of 1937 #2: Fumbling and Bumbling We will look at an influential 2011 paper by Douglas Irwin, available here: http://www.nber.org/papers/w17595.pdf All in all, I think the paper is pretty good, at least in its basic descriptions. It meanders into the usual channels of pointless Monetarism, with some equally pointless math, but it does
Tuesday, June 11, 2019
Alasdair Macleod - Finance and Eco.
  Understanding money and prices
This article explains the money side of prices, and why government currencies, unbacked by gold, are doomed to collapse. And why gold, which is the sound money chosen by markets throughout history, will retain or increase its purchasing power measured in the goods it buys over the coming years.Very few people have a full understanding of the relationship between money and goods. This is the relationship that sets prices. Yet, without that understanding, central banks will almost certainly fail i
Monday, June 3, 2019
Mike Maloney - Goldsilver
  Gold Silver Confiscation: Can the Government Seize Assets
One concern of retail precious metals investors is the possibility of a gold confiscation.Imagine having the forethought to buy gold to shield your finances from an economic or monetary crisis—only to have it taken away from you by your government. You’d lose not just the protective buffer you put in place but potentially a chunk of your net worth.Gold confiscation may sound preposterous to investors used to securities or real estate. But it’s happened in the past enough times to make it a reaso
Saturday, June 1, 2019
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
The “Gold Sterilization” of 1937
Today, we will start investigating the U.S. recession of 1937, and along with that, claims that the Federal Reserve caused it by some sort of misbehavior. As is our usual practice, we will begin with just looking at some general information about that time. Industrial production had a short, sharp shock in 1937. Here’s what it looked like in terms of nominal GDP: I am not going to try to disentangle what was going on at that time. There were a lot of things, from the introduction of Social Sec
Tuesday, May 21, 2019
Robert P. Murphy
3 Modern Arguments for Tariffs, Debunked
 Many proponents of tariffs recognize the absurdity of tariffs as a general rule. However, they feel that there are certain, special cases in which tariffs are justified, and indeed vital to a nation's survival. In  this article, I will analyze three such arguments: I. REDUCE TRADE DEFICIT Many people believe that a tariff on a specific country's goods is necessary whenever the United States suffers from a high trade de
Monday, May 20, 2019
Jeff Clark - Goldsilver
Why Own Gold The Top 10 Reasons to Buy Gold Now
Is gold a good investment? Why should you own it?It’s natural and even prudent for an investor to wonder if a particular asset is a good investment or not. That’s especially true for gold, since it’s an inert metal and doesn’t earn any interest.But the reasons for owning physical gold go beyond the possibility of its price rising. Gold bullion offers distinct advantages that simply can’t be found in almost any other investment. These advantages give you power as an investor. And yes, one of thes
Saturday, May 18, 2019
Hugo Salinas Price - Plata.com
Silver and the Great Future of Mexico
Lecture of the author at the solemn ceremony of his appointment as Honorary Professor of Northwest Institute of Management of the Russian Presidential Academy. Embassy of the Russian Federation Mexico City June 27, 2017. Your Excellency, Ambassador Edward Malayan; Doctor Vladimir Shamakhov, Director of the Northwest Institute of Management of Russian Presidential Academy,members of the Honorable Diplomatic Corps here present, and esteemed audience: I am greatly privileged to be with all of
Sunday, May 5, 2019
Steve Saville - Speculative Investor
Why bad economic theories remain popular
Ludwig von Mises and Friedrich Hayek, the most prominent “Austrian” economists of the time, anticipated the 1929 stock market crash and correctly predicted the dire consequences of government attempts to artificially stimulate economic growth in the aftermath of the crash. John Maynard Keynes, on the other hand, was totally blindsided by the stock market crash and the economic disaster of the early 1930s. And yet, Keynes’s theories gained enormous popularity during the 1930s whereas the work of
Sunday, April 28, 2019
Ronan Manly - Bullion Star
New Gold Pool at the BIS Basle, Switzerland: Part 1
“In the Governor’s absence I attended the meeting in Zijlstra’s room in the BIS on the afternoon of Monday, 10th December to continue discussions about a possible gold pool. Emminger, de la Geniere, de Strycker, Leutwiler, Larre and Pohl were present.”      13 December 1979 – Kit McMahon to Gordon Richardson, Bank of England Introduction A central bank Gold Pool which many people will be familiar with operated in the gold market between November 1961 and March 1968. That Gold Pool was known as t
Thursday, April 18, 2019
Chris Powell - GATA
  State Dept. memo explains U.S. policy to drive gold out of financial system
A long memorandum written in March 1974 by a U.S. State Department official for Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and copied to future Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, then the Treasury Department's undersecretary for monetary affairs, describes the desire of the United States and its options to prevent European countries from increasing the use of gold in the international financial system. The memo, titled "Gold and the Monetary System: Potential U.S.-E.C. Conflict," was recently discov
Monday, April 15, 2019
Frank Shostak
The Connection Between Money-Supply Growth and Inflation
In the article “Rapid money supply growth does not cause inflation” written by Richard Vague at the Institute for New Economic Thinking, December 2, 2016, the author argues that empirical evidence shows that increases in money supply has nothing to do with inflation. According to Vague,Monetarist theory, which came to dominate economic thinking in the 1980s and the decades that followed, holds that rapid money supply growth is the cause of inflation. The theory, however, fails an actual test of
Tuesday, April 9, 2019
Steve Saville - Speculative Investor
  What should the gold/silver ratio be
The price of gold is dominated by investment demand* to such an extent that nothing else matters as far as its price performance is concerned. Investment demand is also the most important driver of silver’s price trend, although in silver’s case industrial demand is also a factor to be reckoned with. In addition, changes in mine supply have some effect on the silver market, because unlike the situation in the gold market the annual supply of newly-mined silver is not trivial relative to the exis
Friday, April 5, 2019
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
  The Story of Gold Money, Past, Present and Future, by Edwin Walter Kemmerer
There aren’t a lot of good books about the gold standard — the monetary system of the world until 1971 — after WWI. There aren’t a lot before WWI either, but it starts to get pretty bad after 1920. Ralph Hawtrey’s books have some merits, but they also have too many errors to serve as a definitive source. Gold and the Gold Standard: The Story of Gold Money, Past, Present and Future (1944) is something of an exception to this pattern. Edwin Walter Kemmerer was a professor at Princeton. Wikipedia o
Tuesday, March 26, 2019
George F. Smith - Barbarous Relic
Gary North on central banking, gold, federal debt, and Keynesianism
I have never met Gary North and probably never will.Yet, through his writings he has had a far-reaching influence on my thinking, especially with regard to government and economics.He runs a membership website, GaryNorth.com.For $14.95 a month you get access to everything on the site, including four daily articles that he writes six days a week and posts while most people are still asleep.Members can ask questions in the forums to which he and other members will post replies. North wrote what
Friday, March 1, 2019
Jeff Clark - Goldsilver
Gold vs. Silver: The 5 Differences That Matter Most to Investors
You’d like to buy some precious metals, but do you buy silver or gold? Is there really much difference between them other than the price?Both are “precious” metals, meaning their occurrence in the earth’s crust is rare. But when it comes to investing in gold vs. silver, there are 5 important distinctions to be aware of. These differences can supercharge your portfolio—or make it a victim.This article outlines the five differences to know about gold vs. silver, with special emphasis on investment
Tuesday, February 26, 2019
Frank Shostak
Why We Now Measure Gold in Dollars — and Not the Other Way Around
Prior to 1933, the name "dollar" was used to refer to a unit of gold that had a weight of 23.22 grains. Since there are 480 grains in one ounce, this means that the name dollar also stood for 0.048 ounce of gold. This in turn, means that one ounce of gold referred to $20.67.Observe that $20.67 is not the price of one ounce of gold in terms of dollars as popular thinking has it, for there is no such entity as a dollar. Dollar is just a name for 0.048 ounce of gold. On this Rothbard wrote,No one p
Sunday, February 24, 2019
Michael J. Kosares - USA Gold
“Accommodative”
Though not a new word to describe Fed policy intentions, using it in today’s statement in the context of obviously rising inflation and inflationary expectations is a new policy stance and one very favorable for gold and likely the Trump administration as well. It seems that the Fed is willing to chase the inflation rate rather than trump it (forgive the reference), and as long as that’s the case, the markets will read inflation into the economic script for the future. I think some were expectin
Friday, February 15, 2019
Mark O'Byrne - gold.ie
Silver Very Undervalued from Historical Perpective of Ancient Greece
– What wages in ancient Athens can tell us about the silver price today – Wages paid in silver in ancient Athens compared to wages today – Silver massively undervalued compared to the past few thousand years The cost of building the Parthenon was 469 silver talents, or about £5.6m. by Dominic Frisby Today we look at the wages paid to oarsmen on warships in ancient Athens in 450BC. I bet you’ve never read a Money Morning that began like that before. Why on earth would I want to do such a thing?
Sunday, February 10, 2019
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