Articles related to Paper money
 
Nick Barisheff - BMSINC
  August 15, 1971: Inflation Unleashed 
The general public, the media and most financial observers were largely unaware of the momentous event that took place on August 15, 1971. However, the implications of that event have had an enormous impact on global financial conditions ever since. On that date, US President Richard Nixon “closed the gold window”. In essence, this meant the US would no longer honour the Bretton Woods Agreement of 1944, which
Thursday, August 15, 2019
Antal E. Fekete - Gold University
Credit Unions 

Tuesday, July 30, 2019
Antal E. Fekete - Gold University
The Two Sources Of Credit

Tuesday, July 23, 2019
Antal E. Fekete - Gold University
Second Front In The Gold World
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Saturday, July 6, 2019
Gold - Antal E. Fekete
The Gold Demonetization Hoax

Tuesday, July 2, 2019
Hugo Salinas Price - plata.com.mx
  The Gold Standard: Generator Protector Of Jobs 
The abandonment of the gold standard in 1971 is closely tied to the massive unemployment the industrialized world has suffered in recent years; Mexico, even with a lower level of industrialization than the developed countries, has also lost jobs due to the closing of industries; in recent years, the creation of new jobs in productive activities has been anemic at best.
Thursday, June 27, 2019
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
The Nonexistent 'Social Costs' of a Gold Standard System
One of the odd notions that has come down through the years is that a gold standard system has “social costs.” It does not. It creates a profit. Of course, it does take effort to dig gold out of the ground. However, gold production never ceased after the end of the world gold standard in 1971. Roughly half of all the gold ever mined, in all of history, has been mined after 1971. Annual production today is the highest in history, and about double what it was in 1970. People seem happy to continu
Friday, June 7, 2019
Frank Shostak
How Much Money should there be  
Most economists believe that a growing economy requires a growing money stock, on grounds that growth gives rise to a greater demand for money which must be accommodated. Failing to do so, it is maintained, will lead to a decline in the prices of goods and services, which in turn will destabilize the economy and lead to an economic recession-or, even worse, depression
Thursday, June 6, 2019
Gold Secrets - Bix Weir
Golden Secrets (V) Chocolate Mountain Military Base 
Here's where it gets a little tricky. The largest gold mine in the world is reported to be the Grasberg Mine in Indonesia with estimated reserves of 1,250 tons of gold (40M oz). According to USGS the total economically mineable gold reserves in the world is only 100,000 tons. And of that the USA only holds about 5,500 tons...or do we?
Tuesday, June 4, 2019
George F. Smith - Barbarous Relic
  Who paid for the Civil War  
When war broke out in 1861, the federal government was without its own money machine, though that would soon change. As expenses from the war mounted, the U.S. government once again issued Treasury Notes to help finance it. The Act of July 17, 1861 authorized Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase to issue notes at 7.
Wednesday, May 22, 2019
Antal E. Fekete - Gold University
The Dismal Monetary Science
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Sunday, May 19, 2019
Philip Judge - Anglo Far East
Peter Daniels Talks On "Gold" Part 2

Sunday, May 19, 2019
Robert Blumen - 24hgold
Real Bills, Phony Wealth 
"The masses are misled by the assertions of the pseudo-experts,” wrote Mises, “that cheap money can make them prosperous at no expense whatever.” The damage that this inflationary fallacy has done to our monetary institutions cannot be over-estimated. In spite of efforts by classical and Austrian economists to refute it, it refuses to die. It has been resurrected under many guises, but all with the same error at its core: that printing money can create real wealth.
Monday, May 13, 2019
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
The Bank of England, 1844-1913
In 1844, there was a new regulation of the Bank of England called the Bank Charter Act of 1844, also known as Peel's Act. Read Wikipedia on the Bank Charter Act of 1844 This officially made the Bank of England the sole issuer of banknotes in England, although it was functionally the sole issuer before then. It also split the Bank into two Departments: an Issue Department, wholly responsible for banknotes, and a Banking Department, which was not involved in
Monday, April 22, 2019
FoFOA
All Paper is STILL a short position on gold 
The gold derivatives pyramid is a vigorous free market creature. It cannot be put down with a simple declaration that the paper is no longer redeemable in gold, as governments did with currency. It is a short selling scheme that has become a trap from which few short sellers will escape
Wednesday, April 17, 2019
Mike Hewitt - Dollar Daze
  Hyperinflation around the Globe 
Angola (1991-1999) Angola went through the worst inflation from 1991 to 1995. In early 1991, the highest denomination was 50,000 kwanzas. By 1994, it was 500,000 kwanzas. In the 1995 currency reform, 1 kwanza reajustado was exchanged for 1,000 kwanzas. The highest denomination in 1995 was 5,000,000 kwanzas reajustados. In the 1999 currency reform, 1 new kwanza was exchanged for 1,000,000 kwanzas reajustados. The overall impact of hyperinflation: 1 new kwanza = 1,000,000,000 pre-1991 kwanzas.
Monday, April 15, 2019
Mike Hewitt - Dollar Daze
America's Forgotten War Against the Central Banks
In order to pay debts incurred from the Seven Years War with France, King George III of England sought to heavily tax the colonies in America. In 1742, the British Resumption Act required that taxes and other debts be paid in gold.
Thursday, April 11, 2019
Frank Shostak
The Connection Between Money-Supply Growth and Inflation
In the article “Rapid money supply growth does not cause inflation” written by Richard Vague at the Institute for New Economic Thinking, December 2, 2016, the author argues that empirical evidence shows that increases in money supply has nothing to do with inflation. According to Vague,Monetarist theory, which came to dominate economic thinking in the 1980s and the decades that followed, holds that rapid money supply growth is the cause of inflation. The theory, however, fails an actual test of
Tuesday, April 9, 2019
Bix Weir
The Three Gold Camps
I believe I have found a suitable starting point when I talk about Gold, and I’d like to share it with you to help explain “WHY” to your friends and family. With people who have little or no knowledge of gold, I have decided to start all conversations by narrowing down the different gold “Camps”. Let’s call them the “3 Gold Camps” and here they are:
Saturday, March 30, 2019
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
  The Story of Gold Money, Past, Present and Future, by Edwin Walter Kemmerer
There aren’t a lot of good books about the gold standard — the monetary system of the world until 1971 — after WWI. There aren’t a lot before WWI either, but it starts to get pretty bad after 1920. Ralph Hawtrey’s books have some merits, but they also have too many errors to serve as a definitive source. Gold and the Gold Standard: The Story of Gold Money, Past, Present and Future (1944) is something of an exception to this pattern. Edwin Walter Kemmerer was a professor at Princeton. Wikipedia o
Tuesday, March 26, 2019
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