Articles related to market
 
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
The Bank of England, 1720-1913
In 1844, there was a new regulation of the Bank of England, which separated the Bank into an Issue Department and a Banking Department. The Issue Department was solely responsible for issuing and managing banknotes, or "currency in circulation." The Banking Department was responsible for lending, including deposits. We recognize today that deposits at the currency issuer (central bank) are a form of base money, much like banknotes, because they are accepted as an ultimate form of payment. Thus, what we now recognize as "base money" was split between the two Departments. This introduced some funny issues, which we may talk about in much more detail later.
Wednesday, April 8, 2020
Jesse - Le Cafe Américain
Currency War: 140 Years of Monetary History in Ten Minutes 
Like most complex subjects reduced to a ten minute summation, there are plenty of nuances lost here, and one might certainly take issue with some of the conclusions. And the perspective of the discussion is largely centered on the US and Europe. Nevertheless, I like the succinct overview of certain key events in recent world monetary history that lead up to the situation in which we find ourselves today. Since most people are abysmally ignorant of where we have been, perhaps that is a good p
Wednesday, April 8, 2020
Jan Skoyles Real Asset Co - The Real Asset Co
  The full guide to Nazi gold and currency war 
This morning’s papers and news-shows are full of the story that in 1939 the Bank of England facilitated the sale of Nazi looted gold, not just once but at least twice during that year. Both times without approval of the British government, despite an attempt to freeze Czech assets. The story of Nazi gold is both fascinating and tragic. We take a look at ‘the greatest robbery of all time’ and draw parallels with the modern day gold migration. What is Nazi gold? Nazi gold is a phrase that refers t
Tuesday, April 7, 2020
Mickey Fulp - Mercenary Geologist
Gold, Silver, and the US Dollar: 1792-1971
In today's musing, I review the history of gold, silver, and fiat currency as money in the United States of America. I document how various wars, panics and depressions, Congressional acts, and executive orders have affected the US dollar prices of precious metals and resulting gold-silver ratios.This musing covers the period from 1792 when the United States government first established a national currency backed by gold and silver until
Monday, April 6, 2020
Confiscation Issue - Goldchat
Australian Gold Confiscation 

Monday, April 6, 2020
Steve Saville - Speculative Investor
  What should the gold/silver ratio be
The price of gold is dominated by investment demand* to such an extent that nothing else matters as far as its price performance is concerned. Investment demand is also the most important driver of silver’s price trend, although in silver’s case industrial demand is also a factor to be reckoned with. In addition, changes in mine supply have some effect on the silver market, because unlike the situation in the gold market the annual supply of newly-mined silver is not trivial relative to the exis
Sunday, April 5, 2020
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
  The Silver:Gold Ratio, 1687-2011 
We have something special this week: the open market value of silver, compared to gold, over a period of over three centuries. The location is London. For a long time, silver and gold were, in a sense, two versions of the same thing, just like one dollar bills and twenty dollar bills are today. Their ratio of value was not perfectly stable, like the 20:1 ratio of $1 bills and $20 bills, but it was quite stable between about 16:1 and 15:1. Both silver and gold ser
Friday, March 27, 2020
Nathan Lewis - New World Economics
March 18, 1968 - "Good Money Is Coined Freedom" Speech by William McChesney Martin, 1968
Today, we have a speech by the Chairman of the Federal Reserve, William McChesney Martin, given on March 18, 1968. At this time, the Bretton Woods era was coming to an end, not because of some inherent problem, but because those in charge of maintaining it (including Martin) really didn't know what they were doing. It was the simplest thing in the world -- a time of peace and prosperity worldwide -- but they were not up to the task. click here for "Good Money Is Coined Freedom," by William McC
Wednesday, March 18, 2020
David Zurbuchen
The World's Cumulative Gold and Silver Production 
This is the first installment of a planned 7-part series: Part 1 - The World's Cumulative Silver and Gold Production. Documenting the total amount of silver and gold produced since recorded history. Part 2 - The Silver Deficit. Documenting the silver production/consumption deficit since 1942. Part 3 - The Real Silver Deficit. Answering the questions of "How much silver has been consumed by industry?" and "In what potentially marketable accessible forms does it remain?" Part 4 -
Friday, March 6, 2020
Antal E. Fekete - Gold University
Is Aggregate Debt Excessive
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Sunday, March 1, 2020
Charleston Voice
Banker Gold Price Suppression Currency Manipulations Have Persisted for 50 years
This 1967 meeting of the FOMC nearly 46 years ago is clear and indisputable evidence of gold price suppression and currency manipulation of the world's "free" and "open" market exchanges.  This criminal cabal has certainly built up their mechanisms since this time to conceal their sinister scheme from issuing dishonest money. It's blatant now and all of "in your face" is their behavioral response to inquiry. Damn the torpedoes, full steam ahead. If you find this too cumbersome to read, the Fed
Thursday, February 27, 2020
Gerard Jackson
The "wealth effect" an Austrian view
It is being said that if the fed could just get the ‘wealth effect’ into motion the US economy would fully recover from the recession. But the ‘wealth effect’ is a phantom, the sort of economic fallacy that only a Keynesian could conjure up.  Those who support this fiction argue that a stock market’s performance is driven by a net inflow of funds which in turn is driven by economic growth. They go further by saying that growth in turn is driven by investment, innovation and productivity, all of
Thursday, February 20, 2020
Jeff Clark - Goldsilver
Gold vs. Silver: The 5 Differences That Matter Most to Investors
You’d like to buy some precious metals, but do you buy silver or gold? Is there really much difference between them other than the price?Both are “precious” metals, meaning their occurrence in the earth’s crust is rare. But when it comes to investing in gold vs. silver, there are 5 important distinctions to be aware of. These differences can supercharge your portfolio—or make it a victim.This article outlines the five differences to know about gold vs. silver, with special emphasis on investment
Thursday, February 20, 2020
George F. Smith - Barbarous Relic
Gary North on central banking, gold, federal debt, and Keynesianism
I have never met Gary North and probably never will.Yet, through his writings he has had a far-reaching influence on my thinking, especially with regard to government and economics.He runs a membership website, GaryNorth.com.For $14.95 a month you get access to everything on the site, including four daily articles that he writes six days a week and posts while most people are still asleep.Members can ask questions in the forums to which he and other members will post replies. North wrote what
Monday, February 17, 2020
Antal E. Fekete - Gold University
Revisionist Theory of Depressions Can It Happen Again
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Saturday, February 15, 2020
Frank Shostak
Why We Now Measure Gold in Dollars — and Not the Other Way Around
Prior to 1933, the name "dollar" was used to refer to a unit of gold that had a weight of 23.22 grains. Since there are 480 grains in one ounce, this means that the name dollar also stood for 0.048 ounce of gold. This in turn, means that one ounce of gold referred to $20.67.Observe that $20.67 is not the price of one ounce of gold in terms of dollars as popular thinking has it, for there is no such entity as a dollar. Dollar is just a name for 0.048 ounce of gold. On this Rothbard wrote,No one p
Monday, February 10, 2020
Perth Mint Blog - Perth Mint Blog.
How Are Spot Prices Determined
There are two key markets in which the prices of gold and silver are determined. 1. Over-the-Counter (OTC) The OTC market consists of traders dealing with other traders on a one-on-one basis. It operates much like the internet â?? it is just a network of traders independently dealing with each other 24 hours a day. OTC is generally meant to refer to professional/corporate entities trading 400oz gold bars (and 1000oz silver bars), usually for settlement in London. However, when you buy
Sunday, February 9, 2020
Robert Blumen
What Is Key for the Price Formation of Gold
Robert Blumen discusses some important but widely misunderstood elements acting on the gold price. He explains that frequently cited gold demand statistics have no relationship to the gold price. In addition, he explains that the annual gold mine production is of very little influence, as gold is hoarded, not consumed like other commodities. Robert Blumen was born in 1964 and gr
Monday, January 27, 2020
Jeff Clark - Goldsilver
What Happens to Gold and Silver When the Stock Market Crashes
Many investors hold gold and silver to hedge against various crises. But does this hedge hold up during stock market crashes?It’s a common assumption that gold and silver prices will fall right along with the market. And if that’s the case, wouldn’t it be better to wait to buy them until after the dust settles?Before formulating a strategy, let’s first look at price data from past stock market crashes…The Message from HistoryI looked at past stock market crashes and meas
Saturday, January 25, 2020
Julian D. W. Phillips - Gold Forecaster
Gold and Silver Market Morning: Jan 25 2017 - Gold and Silver consolidating!
Gold Today–New York closed at $1,209.90on the 24th January after closing at $1,215.30 on the 23rd January.London opened at $1,203.25 today.Overall the dollar was stronger against global currencies early today. Before London’s opening: -The $: € was stronger at $1.0724: €1 from $1.0752: €1 yesterday.-The Dollar index was stronger at 100.31 from 100.20 yesterday. -The Yen was weaker at 113.69:$1 from yesterday’s 113.24 against the dollar. -The Yuan was weaker at 6.8766: $1, from 6.8534: $1, yester
Friday, January 24, 2020
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